Posted in Current Events & News, Games, Sports, Student Posts

FREE PLAY!

 

Last school year, some schools in the U.S., started a new recess program. Each day, teachers set up organized activity stations. Students can choose from games like soccer, volleyball, and four-square. This type of program, called a structured recess, is used by thousands of schools across the United States.  Why can’t we just get to do what we want?

At my school, recess is free time. Of course, teachers are around to make sure everyone behaves. But we can play whatever we want. After sitting in classes all morning, students need a break so we’ll be refreshed and ready to learn in the afternoon.

Plus, sometimes you just want to hang out with friends at recess. We have P.E. class to make sure we get enough exercise. Recess should be a time without so many rules so we can actually do something without being controlled.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Sports, Student Posts

San Diego Padres Then And Now

Trevor Hoffman, San Diego Padres
San Diego Padre, Trevor Hoffman.

The San Diego Padres started as the Pilots in 1936 at the Polo Grounds. The Padres have had a couple World Series appearances. The Padres have multiple Hall Of Famers, and they have six different retired numbers. Padres have the number one farm system in the MLB.

The San Diego Pilots were started in 1936 and won the PCL (Pacific Coast League) title in 1937 led by San Diegan Ted Williams. The original owner was C. Arnholt Smith, a San Diego businessman. They were drafted into the National league on May 27, 1968, for a fee of 12.5 million dollars. Buzzie Bavasi was hired as the owner after retiring from the Dodgers. The teams were chosen in the expansion because American Football was getting too popular. In addition to the Padres the Montreal Expos, Seattle Pilots, and the Kansas City Royals were added in 1969.

In Padres history, only one player has gotten the MVP (most valuable player) award and he is third baseman Ken Caminiti in 1996. Some Padres greats are Tony Gwynn, known for his career batting average of .336  and 3,000+ hits. Also, Trevor Hoffman leads the N.L. in saves with 601. He will go into the Hall Of Fame in July 2018. Also, Wil Myers and Matt Kemp are the only Padres ever to hit for the cycle. The ultimate honor is having your number retired by a team, some retired numbers are: Steve Garvey No. 6, Tony Gwynn No. 19, Dave Winfield No. 31, Randy Jones No. 35, and Trevor Hoffman No. 51.

Tony Gwynn's jersey number 19.
Tony Gwynn’s jersey number 19.

 

Padres made it to the World Series in 1984 against the Tigers and in 1998 against the Yankees.  Padres lost both of those series. In 1998, fireworks happened. In the fifth inning of the 1998 game, Tony Gwynn hit a home run, followed by a home run by Greg Vaughn.

Throughout Padres history, there have been many managers. Some of the recent managers are Bud Black, Pat Murphy, and Andy Green.  The current general manager is A.J Preller. A.J has created the best farm system that includes Fernando Tatis Jr and Mckenzie Gore.

The Padres have had a bright future for a long time, they have always had good prospects, but it’s never happened. 2018 has a great future and I can’t wait to see Trevor Hoffman get into the Hall Of Fame. See you in Cooperstown.

   

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Sports, Student Posts

The Heart of a Champion

 

Ezra Shaw/Getty
Laurie Hernandez in action!

Have you ever thought what it would be like to go to the Olympics? In Rio 2016 Laurie Hernandez won a couple of gold medals and one silver on beam. Laurie Hernandez is not the kind of person who gives up on their first try. She is the kind of person who works hard and tries to succeed! Imagine you are Laurie tumbling on the floor, taking step by step on beam, and reaching out for the bars.

Family comes first              

Laurie’s family has always counted on her to do things. She had very supportive parents and siblings, Marcus Hernandez and Jelysa Hernandez are her siblings. Her family is always there to cheer her on and bring joy when she is competing. She always believed with the support of her family she could do it.                                                             

Keeping it fit

By doing gymnastics Laurie has to keep track of her fitness. Laurie goes to the gym to train six days a week. Since the 2016 summer Olympics Laurie said that she would have a break from gymnastics, but keep on working out at the regular gym.

Practice makes perfect

How can anybody succeed if they don’t practice? Laurie Hernandez is not a quitter. If she has a task to complete she practices and tries to complete that task. When Laurie gets hurt and it is best to just sit out, she still practices the skills she can and does a lot of conditioning. She tries to improve each time she practices her skills.

Are you ever going to succeed in life if when you run into a problem you just give up and forget about it? Laurie Hernandez is training really hard to become a USA champion which she already is! “ I hope my story inspires you to gold and beyond.”

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Games, Special Events, Sports, Student Posts

The Last Great Race

Iditarod 2017 frostnip907 via Compfight

There are few things harder than scaling Mt. Everest, the world’s tallest mountain1. One of these things is completing the Iditarod. Read on to find out more about this daring sport.

You’re probably asking, “What is Iditarod?” It’s known as the Last Great Race on Earth2 and unlike other sports, it goes on for several days instead of a few hours. The team is made up of a driver called musher who gives commands to a group of 10-18 sled dogs.  Teams must travel 1,049 miles with checkpoints along the way from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska. In addition to the length of the race, the weather is rough over the challenging terrain which includes snow, mountains and narrow gorges. Even with all these obstacles, people still want to win the race for the top prize: up to $70,000 and a new pickup truck.

Next, let’s go into how the sport originated. Joe Redington founded the Iditarod race in 1973. Because of this, he was nicknamed The Founding Father of Iditarod. Joe Redington founded the race to remind people about the importance of sled dogs in Alaska3. Sled dogs were used for transportation, daily work, and they helped Eskimo Scouts patrol the state. When snowmachines and snowmobiles were invented, people used sled dogs less and less.  Joe Redington hoped the race would bring attention to the sled dogs and reminds people that they are strong, intelligent and can hold many occupations.

Now, let’s go through some fun facts about Iditarod. Iditarod comes from an Ingalik word for a local river, Haiditarod, which means distant place. In the history of the race, the longest one took more than 32 straight days by John Shultz. If the snow melts, the race can have a different starting line or trails. The only dogs allowed to participate are Huskies and malamutes. This rule was created after John Suter allowed his poodles to participate in the competition. Not all dogs are allowed to race because their fur or hair may not be able to handle the cold weather.  Besides the cold weather, another danger for the teams is moose. They have attacked some of the teams in previous races.4

Now that you know more about Iditarod, are you ready to give it a try? Over 1,000 miles, extremely cold weather and long days are not good enough? I bet $70,000, a new pickup truck and twelve super cute huskies as part of your team will change your mind.

References

1The Great Alone. Greg Kohs, Alkemy-X, 2015, documentary.

2 Iditarod Trail Committee, www.Iditarod.com, 2017.

3 Freedman, Lew, www.alaskasportshall.org/inductee/joe-redington-sr/ 2017.

4 Mcpherson, Angie, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140308-iditarod-dogs-sled-race-alaska-willow-science/ , 2014.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Sports, Student Posts

Is Football Safe for Kids?

Image result for youth tackle football

Is the football field a safe place? Should kids in grades lower than grade 5 play tackle football? The following information about tackle football vs. flag football just might change your mind about your opinion about tackle football. I believe that kids should be allowed to play tackle football at all ages.

For example, to be safer on the football field, youth leagues like Pop Warner are banning kickoffs to prevent future injuries. The reason why there are more severe injuries during kickoffs is because people come head-on to the team that is catching the football. This ban will help prevent injuries for all youth tackle football players.

The youth league coaches are teaching their players how to tackle properly, so less injuries will happen. Also, kids are not allowed to swipe people out from the legs. Now it will be a lot safer when you get tackled during football.

Also, kids are now getting the proper protective gear to play tackle football so the hits   don’t cause as many serious injuries. The helmet worn provides head protection so you won’t get a concussion if you get injured. The chest plate prevents you from breaking your rib cage or collar bone. The back plate prevents you from breaking your spine, a.k.a. your backbone.

Youth of all ages should be able to play tackle football. You may think that younger children shouldn’t play tackle football, but they are learning many new ways to be safer out on the football field. Instead of not allowing younger kids to play tackle football, coaches should make sure that kids are not allowed to do kickoffs, they should teach kids how to properly tackle, and they should enforce that kids use proper protective gear. Therefore, if all of these rules about playing tackle football are followed, kids of all ages should be allowed to play tackle football because they will be a lot safer out on the football field.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Games, Health, Sports

Vote For Tackle Football!

Kids-56952 1280.jpgHow many kids in the USA play tackle football? 1,088,158 and that’s a lot, but now people are going to take that away. Do you think tackle football for youths should be banned? A lot of people think this but I wrote this essay to convince people that tackle football is safe to play.

Imagine it, the fourth quarter, you’re down by seven and there’s five seconds left. You’re the wide receiver for your team and the ball goes to you! The opposing team comes to tackle you and you’re scared out of your mind! You’re running like crazy and then you hear the crowd chanting touchdown! Touchdown! It’s the greatest moment of your life! Youth football haters, do you want to take this moment away from kids? If you’re still not convinced here are some reasons that tackle football is safe.

Just to be safe, youth leagues like Pop Warner are taking it to the next level. My first reason is Pop warner will ban kickoffs because prevent major injuries. This will satisfy a lot of youth tackle football haters. The youth league coaches are teaching their players how to tackle properly so it makes less injuries. Now tackles will be a lot safer.“Youth football is safer now than it’s ever been” says Jon Butler, the head coach of Pop Warner.  

Also,kids are getting the proper gear to play tackle football so the hits don’t hurt as much. In order to play,They are required to wear the following: Helmet, chest plate,and backplate. The helmet provides head protection so you won’t get a concussion or brain injury if you get injured. The chest plate prevents you from breaking your ribs or collar bone. The back plate prevents you from breaking your spine a.k.a backbone.

The opposing side does not favor tackle football. They want to take those awesome fumbles and tackles away. Worst of all, they want to replace this sport with the dreaded flag football. I think that flag football is basically a spin off of the sport Rugby and that spin offs aren’t very good. This is why I chose tackle over flag.

I think tackle football for youths should be allowed and I think you should to. If you follow these rules about tackle football, next time you play I assure you that you will be a whole lot safer.

https://pixabay.com/en/users/Greyerbaby-2323/https://pixabay.com/en/kids-football-games-tackle-sports-56952/, CC0, Link

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Current Events & News, Sports

Redskins No More

by Garret

burgundy and gold Bill Dickinson via Compfight

The Washington Redskins should change their name and logo because it is offensive to Native Americans. Hundreds of sports teams have racist team names, so they need to change their name. The mascot does not look like a real Native American. Fans bring weapons called tomahawks to the game,this makes them seem violent  Whereas some people think they shouldn’t change because that is their original name.

The first reason why I state teams need to change their names is that many mascots and fans do not dress like real Native Americans. Wearing a headdress is considered an honor among tribes. This makes it offensive to some tribes that dress that way. Fans dress up like a specific tribe suggesting that Native Americans are just one big tribe with the same clothings and customs.

The mascots wear face paint and carry indian weapons called tomahawks. Native Americans point out that this makes them seem violent and bloody. The mascot looks like a cartoon,the 1951 logo looks nothing like a real Native American.

Few people would ever call a Native American a redskin to his or her face because they know it is an offensive word. This makes it racist and offensive. We have already gone over this, why do we have to go over it again. Racism is wrong.

The Redskins should change their name because it is racist and offensive, no one would call someone a redskin to his or her face and the logo looks nothing like a real Native American. Some people think different and don’t agree that the redskins logo is racist and offensive. They think that because that was their logo since they were originated they should not change it. Hundreds of sports teams have racist team names and they need to change it because it is racist and offensive. One of them is the Washington Redskins.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email